Kubo and the Two Strings

“Go Behind the scenes of the new Laika Studios Kubo and the Two Strings in 3 new Making Of showing their process, mixing technology & Stop Motion. Kubo lives a quiet, normal life in a small shoreside village until a spirit from the past turns his life upside down by re-igniting an age-old vendetta. This causes all sorts of havoc as gods and monsters chase Kubo who, in order to survive, must locate a magical suit of armor once worn by his late father, a legendary Samurai warrior.”

-> See more about the making of here.

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PEJAC – “LAW OF THE WEAKEST”

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“Showing a comprehensive body of work that ranges from sculptures, installations, drawings to wide scope of different canvas pieces, the Barcelona-based artist proved all the high expectations about this show to be completely grounded. His unique blend of knowledge, witty creativity and massive artistic talent, resulted in strong and large body of work that speaks volumes. Tackling some of the most sensitive subjects, the pieces comment on environmental, political, economical or social issues that everyone can recognize. Using unexpected twists, visual illusions or bizarre paradoxes, Pejac creates images that attract attention and get the mind working. Pieces often include familiar imagery, whether from every day life or art history, and twist them around in order to pass on a strong message. Subtle yet powerful, the entire body of work consisting of over 30 pieces surely deserves the attention it is getting. Cleverly installed in a coherent showing, the entire exhibition has almost a narrative feel from the effective ball pit installation at the beginning until the “last” contemporary take on the iconic photograph of Buddhist monk self-immolation. —Sasha Bogojev” Via Juxtapoz

Photoluminescent Resin Tables – Mike Warren

Aki Inomata – Hermit Crabs

Justin Gershenson-Gates – Mechanical Bugs

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Chicago-based jeweler Justin Gershenson-Gates recently grew a bit tired of creating jewelry after a show this summer and while experimenting with some watch part anatomy he decided to try his hand at spider and insect legs. One thing led to another a new series of small sculptural arthropods and insects was born. Justin tells me via email that each piece takes several hours to make and being unable to leave things unfinished he generally makes an entire new creature in one sitting, a monumental feat considering the scorpions can take an entire 12-hour work session as the watch springs, stems, gears and straps are assembled and soldered together (nothing is glued). I love the idea of the tiny light bulb for the spider abdomens.

If you’d like to see these crawly pieces up-close, you can see a few at the Bucktown Holiday Art Show December 8th and 9th, and you can also pick up some of the spiders on Etsy, at least for the moment. Tons more photos on Facebook. Via Colossal.

Willow – “Sweater” Music Video

Bedow and The310Investigator- Money Worlds Made from Country’s Own Currency

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hey say that money makes the world go round but these creatively designed maps give that saying a whole new meaning. Swedish design studio Bedow, run by creative director Perniclas Bedow, produced the world map, above, using international coins. Each continent is formed out of the region’s varied native currencies. There is said to be a total of 3,000 coins used for the innovative piece.

Alternatively, redditor The310Investigator created a world map featuring paper currency. With the handy use of photo manipulation, the artist was able to cut the different banknotes into the shape of their respective countries and piece them together like a giant money jigsaw puzzle. After the artist’s 12 hours of digital labor, we’re treated to a map that showcases what a colorful world we live in! Via MyModernMet.

Caitlind R.C. Brown – 6,000 Light Bulb Cloud

 

 

 

CLOUD is a large scale interactive installation by artist Caitlind R.C. Brown that appeared September 15th as part of Nuit Blanche Calgary in Alberta, Canada. The piece is made from 1,000 working lightbulbs on pullchains and an additional 5,000 made from donated burnt out lights donated by the public. Via Clolssal.

Beth Cavener Stichter – Animal Forms

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The artist forms animals by hollowing out blocks of clay, giving her subjects a raw, unrefined appearance as if they sprang from the material itself. In her latest body of work for her second solo show at Claire Oliver Gallery, “Come Undone,” Cavener Stichter refined her aesthetic, creating animal sculptures that are more stylized with deep grooves and glazed with different shades of gray — a departure from her minimally embellished work from the past. Take a look at a few images from “Come Undone,” which opens September 13 at Claire Oliver in New York City. Via HiFructose.

Brian Matthew Hart – Light Painting Mosaics

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Hart created a number of mosaics using individual exposures, the largest hand above, part of an unfinished diptych, is made from 324 photographs!

Yuken Teruya – Paper Bag Tree

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Laura Harris – Gear Mosaics

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In 1985, artist Laura Harris of Melonhead Gallery was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, which forced her to quit her job as a teacher. That same year, she took up the fine art of creating mosaics, focusing on her craft full-time. Since then, the skilled mosaic artist has created some amazing works of art that not only allow Harris to push through her physically restricting disease, but also to hone in on her creative abilities.

The artist’s mixed media portraits exhibit an intriguing array of materials that range from standard mosaic components like glass, porcelain, ceramic and stone to the eye-catching and inventive elements typically found in bikes and clocks. Incorporating bicycle gears, watch parts (including both cogs and faces), and old–fashioned keys straight out of fairy tales into her portrait pieces, Harris adds layers of enchantment and technology to her magically-driven mosaics.

There’s a surreal quality to Harris’ work that allows the viewer to be swept away into a fantasy. Each of her characters seem to be making their own journey, eyes shut, into an alternate universe where dreams come true. There are recurring themes of dreaming and making a wish present throughout her body of work. The artist seems to be displaying her own inner desires apparent with her fragmented works, saying, “Mosaics allow me to fuse the pieces together to create something cohesive and beautiful, what I wish the world could be.” Via My Modern Met.

100 Phone Booths Given to 100 Artists on the Streets of São Paulo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call Padre is an ongoing public art project in São Paulo sponsored by Brazilian telecommunications firm Vivo, that paired 100 artists with 100 street-side phone booths giving them free reign to transform the peculiar hooded fixtures into anything imaginable. The exhibition has proven to be extremely popular and Brazilian photographer Mariane Borgomani set out to capture a number of the phones, my favorite of which is the painted day/night treatment above by artist Maramgoní. You can see a gallery of all 100 phones here. Via Colossal.

Motoi Yamamoto – Salt Installations

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Using a simple household material, salt, as his primary medium, Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto creates fantastical blizzards and seascapes that touch upon conceptual frontiers. Since Hi-Fructose correspondent Nathan Spoor interviewed Yamamoto in 2009, the artist has had several solo shows that yielded delicate, pristine works that are entrancing to look at with their repetitive and meticulous details. Many of Yamamoto’s works have a labyrinthine structure that the artist describes as “nearly reachable, yet not quite,” alluding to the idea of trying to recall past experiences and coming to terms with the fleeting nature of memory. Take a look at some of Yamamoto’s latest works from his shows at the Bellevue Arts Museum, Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the Hakone Open-Air Museum. Via HiFructose.

Yuko Nishimura – Mandalas Formed from Single Piece of Paper

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Japanese artist Yuko Nishimura reworks single sheets of handmade paper into abstract, contoured works of art in her series labeled as Relief. She employs the paper folding techniques used in origami to transform the special Japanese paper known as kyokushi into mesmerizing geometric patterns. She combines traditional methods with contemporary aesthetics across a monochromatic color scheme to make for one visually interesting set of paper structures that echo the shape and visual pattern of mandalas.

Adding to their intriguing form is the fact that, unlike typical origami, they remain fairly two-dimensional. The grooves created through Nishimura’s expert execution of paper folding certainly adds some dimension to the paper, but it looks more like a flat, symmetrical piece of circular paper has been drawn on. It’s hard to believe that the smooth creases are, in fact, folds. Light plays a crucial role in the way abstract designs and shadows are created as it hits the artist’s creations, revealing the folds. Still, her ability to create such clean and curving lines is absolutely astounding. Nishimura’s work reflect her meticulous skill and patience. Via My Modern Met.

Stefan Künzler

Stefan Künzler

 

 

 

 

Edwin Deen – Rainbow Sprinkler

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Have a blank white room in need of an instant color treatment? Consider this glorious rainbow sprinkler by Netherlands-based artist Edwin Deen. Using some color pigment, an electric tap, a few meters of hose and a plain garden sprinkler, Deen transformed a simple garden sprinkler into a smile-inducing artistic device. I have the sudden urge to put on a white painter’s uniform and start prancing through this thing. The rainbow sprinkler will be on display at BARRY at the W in Amsterdam starting at the end of this week. All images courtesy the artist. And if you like this, also check out the Robo Rainbow. Via Colossal.

Daniel Lai, “Kenjio” – Book Sculptures

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Malaysia-born, Tennessee-based artist Daniel Lai, aka Kenjio, uses a visually captivating paper folding technique for his inspired book sculptures. Each book blossoms outward in waves of paper folded unto themselves, accompanied by a clay figurine of a man deep in thought. The sculptor’s series of Thinker sculptures, echoing Rodin’s The Thinker, exhibit an astute attention to detail and skill in multi-mediums, including paper and clay.

The beautiful imagery created by Kenjio’s folding method mimics that of a fully-bloomed flower or perhaps a cog in a timepiece. The literary sculptures reinterpret the appeal of knowledge and reflect the limitations of time to absorb said knowledge. Kenjio has constructed a realm of his own where the thinking man reigns atop his literary throne. Via My Modern Met.

Azuma Makoto – Leaf Sculptures

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Patrícia Almeida – Umbrella Installation Photos

 

 

 

Flickr photographer Patrícia Almeida recently shot these great photos of a wonderfully whimsical umbrella installation using her iPhone and camera. Like something out of a fairy tale, the umbrellas look almost like they’re magically floating in mid-air. As she writes, “In July in Águeda (a Portuguese town) some streets are decorated with colorful umbrellas. I felt like a kid, amazed by all that color!” Love this kind of outdoor art. (Bonus points that it provides nice shade for those strolling along the street!) Via My Modern Met.

Diem Chau – Pencil Tip Sculptures

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Mia Liu – Watercolor Sculpture

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There are so many kinds, colors, and textures of paper that can be used in artistic creation. Taiwan-based artist Mia Liu finds inspiration from this medium and takes it one step further by transforming generally flat paper forms into three dimensional sculptures. The artist says she is “particularly mesmerized by the unique textures created by drawing on different papers; [She] loves to discover different papers from her everyday life to use as her creative medium, and the medium itself also leads to the inspiration for her installation works.”

This installation, entitled Can’t Stop Rolling It Up, was originally a drawing that was enlarged onto 144 full sheets of watercolor paper and then cut and curled into strips and attached to an aluminum board. The visually stimulating work is an abstract swirl of pastel colors that can be viewed differently depending on the viewer’s proximity to the piece. From close up, the thousands of curls of paper create a very tactile experience while, from a distance, viewers are able to fully enjoy the sensations of the piece as a more flat, abstract painting. According to Liu, “The outcome is not only a drawing, but is also a further step in indicating to the viewers the artist’s individual dream.” Via My Modern Met.

Joe Black – 5500 Toy Soldiers

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Markus Reugels – Liquid Sculptures

These are some seriously cool water sculptures, I highly recommend you all go check out his website I’ve posted here and flip through his portfolio because there are so many more amazing pieces!

Markus Reugels